Google+ Followers

dimanche 24 février 2013

Surprise! A high fat ketogenic diet is not deleterious for lipid levels




Can Children With Hyperlipidemia Receive Ketogenic Diet for Medication-Resistant Epilepsy?

  1. Yeou-Mei Christiana Liu, MSc1
  2. Helen Lowe, MSc1
  3. Maria M. Zak, MN1
  4. Jeff Kobayashi, MD1
  5. Valerie W. Chan, BScN1
  6. Elizabeth J. Donner, MD1
  1. 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  1. Yeou-Mei Christiana Liu, MSc, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada. Email: christiana.liu@sickkids.ca

Abstract

The very-high-fat ketogenic diet can worsen lipid levels in children with pre-existing hyperlipidemia by increasing serum lipoproteins and reducing antiatherogenic high-density lipoproteins. A retrospective chart review of 160 children treated with the ketogenic diet from September 2000 to May 2011 was performed. Twelve children with pre-existing hyperlipidemia were identified. Lipid levels including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein were measured pre-diet and at 3, 6, and 12 months of treatment. During treatment, there was a significant reduction in mean total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein were normalized in 8 and 7 children at 6 months; and 9 and 9 children at 12 months respectively. At 6 and 12 months, tot cholesterol/HDL ratio was normalized in 5 and 7 children respectively. Diet modifications were made to achieve healthy lipid levels. By extrapolating the data, it suggests lipid levels can be controlled in children and adults with ketogenic diet treatment.


And a low GL diet with high fat content improves the lipid profile of D2 patients:








http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510974/

And even Hu acknowledges it:


 2012 Oct 1;176 Suppl 7:S44-54. doi: 10.1093/aje/kws264.

Effects of low-carbohydrate diets versus low-fat diets on metabolic risk factors: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

Source

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.

Abstract

The effects of low-carbohydrate diets (≤45% of energy from carbohydrates) versus low-fat diets (≤30% of energy from fat) on metabolic risk factors were compared in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Twenty-three trials from multiple countries with a total of 2,788 participants met the predetermined eligibility criteria (from January 1, 1966 to June 20, 2011) and were included in the analyses. Data abstraction was conducted in duplicate by independent investigators. Both low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets lowered weight and improved metabolic risk factors. Compared with participants on low-fat diets, persons on low-carbohydrate diets experienced a slightly but statistically significantly lower reduction in total cholesterol(2.7 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval: 0.8, 4.6), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.7 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 6.4), but a greater increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.3 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval: 1.9, 4.7) and a greater decrease in triglycerides (-14.0 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval: -19.4, -8.7). Reductions in body weight, waist circumference and other metabolic risk factors were not significantly different between the 2 diets. These findings suggest that low-carbohydrate diets are at least as effective as low-fat diets at reducing weight and improving metabolic risk factors. Low-carbohydrate diets could be recommended to obese persons with abnormal metabolic risk factors for the purpose of weight loss. Studies demonstrating long-term effects of low-carbohydrate diets on cardiovascular events were warranted.



Aucun commentaire: