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vendredi 30 octobre 2015

Relative risk of cancer, refined nutrients and specific foods


Sugar increases pancreatic cancer risk.

"During a mean follow-up of 7.2 y, we identified 131 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. The consumption of added sugar, soft drinks, and sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for the highest compared with the lowest consumption categories were 1.69 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.89; P for trend = 0.06) for sugar, 1.93 (1.18, 3.14; P for trend = 0.02) for soft drinks, and 1.51 (0.97, 2.36; Pfor trend = 0.05) for sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit."

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/5/1171/T2.expansion.html
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/5/1171.full


Fructose sucrose and GL increase the risk of colorectal cancer in men


http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/14/1/138/T2.expansion.html

http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/14/1/138.long


Meat and colorectal cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4420687/figure/F1/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25751512
Viande rouge neutre pour le risque de cancer colorectal

Essentiellement les saucisses
Red Meat:
The summary RRs for the highest versus lowest red meat intake comparison were 1.10 (95% CI  = 1.00−1.21), 1.18 (95% CI  = 1.04−1.35), and 1.14 (95% CI  = 0.83−1.56) for colorectal, colon, and rectal cancer respectively (Table 1). The mean of the highest category of red meat intake ranged from 26 to 197 grams per day in the studies. In dose-response meta-analyses, red meat was statistically significantly associated with increased risk of colorectal (RR for 100 g/day increase  = 1.17, 95% CI  = 1.05−1.31) (8 studies, 4314 cases) and colon cancer (RR for 100 g/day increase  = 1.17, 95% CI  = 1.02−1.33) (10 studies, 3561 cases) (Table 1) (Figure 4). No significant association was observed with rectal cancer (RR for 100 g/day increase  = 1.18, 95% CI  = 0.98−1.42) (7 studies, 1477 cases). Influence analyses did not suggest strong influence from any of the individual studies on the summary estimates.
Processed meat:
Eighteen studies were included in the highest versus lowest meta-analyses [18][20][22],[26][28][33][34][49][50][52][54][56][57][60][62][64][65]. Processed meat intake was significantly related to the risk of colorectal (RR highest vs lowest  = 1.17, 95% CI  = 1.09−1.25), colon (RR highest vs lowest  = 1.19, 95% CI  = 1.11−1.29), and rectal cancer (RR highest vs lowest  = 1.19, 95% CI  = 1.02−1.39) (Table 1). The mean of the highest category of processed meat intake ranged from 16 to 122 grams per day in the studies. Four studies could not be used to derive dose-response estimates [20][28][62][66]. The summary RR for every 50 g/day increase in processed meat was 1.18 (95% CI  = 1.10−1.28) (9 studies, 10863 cases) for colorectal cancer and 1.24 (95% CI  = 1.13−1.35) (10 studies, 6727 cases) for colon cancer (Table 1) (Figure 5). For rectal cancer, no significant dose-response association was observed (RR for 50 g/day increase  = 1.12, 95% CI  = 0.99−1.28) (8 studies, 2565 cases). Influence analyses did not suggest strong influence from any of the individual studies on the summary estimates.

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